McGill Quick Links

Letters sent to Flick, Lawrence F.


Date: 
April 18, 1904
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Arrangements for the upcoming meeting of the Unites States Society for the Study of Tuberculosis.


Date: 
November 22, 1898
From: 
Otis, E.O.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Otis is in favour of Flick's proposal to form a National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis.


Date: 
December 9, 1898
From: 
Otis, E.O.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Otis wrote to Dr. Knopf regarding the formation of a National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, and he too is in support of such an association.


Date: 
December 21, 1898
From: 
Otis, E.O.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Otis reports that Dr. Knight believes the object of the proposed Society for the Study of Tuberculosis could be accomplished within the American Climatological Association.


Date: 
January 2, 1899
From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf congratulates Flick on his idea to organize an American Society for the Study of Tuberculosis. Knopf is highly in favour of such a movement. He recently met with Otis who, though President of the American Climatological Association, is also in favour of Flick's project.


Date: 
February 3, 1899
From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf believes that it would be best to put off the creation of a Tuberculosis Congress because of the possibility of opposition from the American Climatological Association. Knopf refers to his own article on the Tuberculosis problem, published in the North American Review, which weighs in favour of establishing a National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis


Date: 
February 13(?), 1899
From: 
Otis, E.O.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Otis writes that among the men already interviewed, there does not seem to be a strong desire for a new Society for the Study of Tuberculosis. However, Otis would like to continue with the project. He writes of Dr. White, a young physician working on the prevalence of Tuberculosis.


Date: 
December 8, 1899
From: 
Bell, Clark
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Invitation to the Congress on Tuberculosis of the Medico-Legal Society. Professor Keyes and Dr. J. Mount Bleyer will be among the presenters.


Date: 
January 29, 1900
From: 
Bell, Clark
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Flick's presentation at the Congress on Tuberculosis, to be held under the auspices of the Medico-Legal Society on February 21, 1900.


Date: 
February 13, 1900
From: 
Bell, Clark
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Clark writes that it is now too late to withdraw names from the program for the Congress on Tuberculosis. He advises Flick to enroll for the Congress whether he plans to attend or not.


Date: 
February 15, 1900
From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf would like to meet with Flick while he is in New York for the Congress on Tuberculosis. He urges Flick to visit the Tenement-house Exhibition.


Date: 
May 22, 1901
From: 
Long, B.G.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

The conclusion reached in Buffalo on the Tuberculosis question was that it would be best to arrange a section on "Prevention of Tuberculosis" for the meeting of the American Public Health Association, instead of organizing a separate body.


Date: 
February 10, 1902
From: 
Lee, Benjamin
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Lee asks if Flick has changed his mind regarding the "American Congress of Tuberculosis." Holton, who is President of the American Public Health Association, will also serve as President of the Congress. Lee writes that many other prominent men are in support of this movement.


Date: 
March 10, 1902
From: 
Wyman, Walter
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

The organization of a Tuberculosis Congress is a matter that requires serious consideration. Wyman would like to help to bring about such a Congress, but is hesitant to take the initiative.


Date: 
April 25, 1902
From: 
Stone, William A.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Flick has been appointed as a delegate to represent the state of Pennsylvania at the American Congress of Tuberculosis in New York City, May 14-16, 1902.


Date: 
April 30, 1902
From: 
Ruck, Karl von
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Von Ruck has accepted the chairmanship on the Committee of the third symposium of the Congress on Tuberculosis. He asks Flick to present a paper in his section of the Congress.


Date: 
May 5, 1902
From: 
Ruck, Karl von
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Von Ruck shares Flick's suspicions of the Congress on Tuberculosis in New York. His decision to attend was based on his plan to take the Congress out of its present hands and place it upon a more ethical basis. However, the Congress has now been postponed until June, during a time when von Ruck will not be free to attend.


Date: 
May 15, 1902
From: 
Herwig, Edgar
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Herwig addresses Flick's suspicions of the Congress on Tuberculosis. He assures Flick that the Governor has no desire to hinder science. He leaves it to Flick to decide if he should attend the Congress or not.


Date: 
July 22, 1903
From: 
Fulton, John S.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Letter of introduction for Dr. Marshall Price, Medical Officer of the Maryland Tuberculosis Commission, who is planning a Tuberculosis exhibition in Baltimore.


Date: 
August 1, 1903
From: 
McCarthy, D.J.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Dr. Pannwitz's visit to America. Pannwitz believes that Koch, who is now in Africa, and many others could be induced to come to America for an International Tuberculosis Congress. Pannwitz suggests that a Committee on Tuberculosis be organized as a consistent member of the International Bureau and made up of experts such as Flick, Osler, Knopf, Trudeau, and others.


Date: 
October 27, 1903
From: 
Ravenel, Mazyck P.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Ravenel discusses developments in the scheme to create a Tuberculosis Committee and a new Congress on Tuberculosis.


Date: 
November 2, 1903
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler would like to arrange for Musser, Wilson, Tyson, and Flick to meet Mr. Phipps over dinner. Osler will do anything he can to help bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. He does not know anything about the American Congress of Tuberculosis, but has heard that it is not in the hands of the right men.


Date: 
November 3, 1903
From: 
Bracken, H.M.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Bracken provides a list of all the people involved in Tuberculosis work in Minnesota. He explains that the issue of the Congress on Tuberculosis is complicated by the fact that Daniel Lewis and Clark Bell are planning two separate events. He advises Flick to join his efforts with those of Lewis and hold a Tuberculosis Congress in Washington in 1905. He feels that it would be wrong to destroy the American Congress of Tuberculosis and that it looks bad on the U.S. to have different organizations working separately on the same issues.


Date: 
November 9, 1903
From: 
Bracken, H.M.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Bracken is pleased to hear that the Phipps Institute will take a neutral position on the Congress on Tuberculosis question for the time being. He agrees with Flick that Drs. Trudeau and Biggs should not be left out of any Congress dealing with Tuberculosis. He comments on Daniel Lewis's strategy for organizing his own Congress.


Date: 
November 10, 1903
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler has just heard from Magnin in Paris that the International Congress on Tuberculosis has been postponed until 1905. Because two Congresses cannot be held in the same year, plans to bring the International Congress to the U.S. will have to be put off until 1906.


Date: 
November 10, 1903
From: 
Porter, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Porter is in support of Flick's plans to bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. He received an invitation to Clark Bell's Congress, but he feels that Clark has not earned the confidence of the Tuberculosis workers in the country.


Date: 
November 17, 1903
From: 
Trudeau, Edward Livingston
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Trudeau feels that Clark Bell's last attempt to organize a Congress on Tuberculosis was a dismal failure. However, he understands that planning an event such as that is very difficult, as medical politics often get in the way. He is happy to stay out of the politics and continue on with his own work.


Date: 
November 21, 1903
From: 
Porter, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Porter has refused any official connection to Clark Bell's Congress on Tuberculosis. He lists several necessary measures that must be taken to combat the spread of Tuberculosis in urban centres.


Date: 
November 25, 1903
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Osler's upcoming lecture in Philadelphia. He reports that the rivalry over the Tuberculosis question has intensified. After Osler informed people in Paris that there would be no Congress on Tuberculosis in the U.S. in 1905, he saw in the paper that Daniel Lewis's Congress has been postponed until 1905. Osler believes that a national committee should be organized to take charge of the entire issue.


Date: 
November 28, 1903
From: 
Bell, Clark
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Clark asks for a copy of Flick's book, "The Crusade Against Tuberculosis." He sends Flick an endorsement made by the U.S. Government for his American Congress of Tuberculosis. He asks Flick to be part of a committee appointed by The World's Fair Exposition for the purpose of organizing an International Congress on Tuberculosis in St. Louis.

Pages