McGill Quick Links

Letters dated 1917


Date: 
September 17, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Gunther, Robert
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Gunther for his message of sympathy. They will face it bravely.


Date: 
September 17, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Adami, John George
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Adami for his message of sympathy. They are facing the blow bravely. Invitation to Isabel to visit them.


Date: 
September 17, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Dock, George
Abstract: 

Osler announces Revere's death. Details on the wounds. Brewer and Darrach of New York operated and Crile transfused. Cushing was with him at the end. The blow was not unexpected. They shall take it bravely. They console themselves with his memory who never gave them anything but pleasure. Description of Revere's character. Mentions his interest in books. Understands their anxiety for George. He has told George to let him know at any time if he or Bill should be ill, as he could help.


Date: 
(September 18, 1917?)
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
MacCaskill, Miss
Abstract: 

Osler is glad that Miss MacCaskill is back and at work. Mentions a brief paper he wrote. He knows nothing of anaesthetics. Civilities.


Date: 
September 19, 1917
From: 
Chapin, Susan Revere
To: 
Cushing, Katharine Stone Crowell
Abstract: 

Chapin writes of Revere's death, of the comfort it has brought his grieving parents to know that Cushing was by his side when he died. She writes that Osler seems to be shrinking away and that Grace's face is sad beyond words. Chapin worries that she has been a burden to Grace, and hopes to join the war-effort in France.


Date: 
January 27 - September 22, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Foy, George
Abstract: 

Cards from Osler to Foy concerning a case of witch burning in Ireland. Attached is a letter from Foy to Cushing.


Date: 
September 22, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Adami, John George
Abstract: 

Osler invites Adami and Isabel for the next weekend. Could introduce his daughter to Radclivian circles. They have just returned from Swanage.


Date: 
September 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Ballinger, John
Abstract: 

Osler willcome to the meeting and do anything to help. States that the main question is between a number of poor schools and a few good ones. ( Relates to a proposal with regards to a scheme of studies leading to librarianship.)


Date: 
September 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Malloch, Thomas Archibald
Abstract: 

They are back (from Swanage) and at work with sore heart. Explains that although he knew it would come, that does not make it less hard. Project to get a specimen page of each section of his library and of the index. Encouragement to push on with the Pneumonia work.


Date: 
September 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Malloch, Thomas Archibald
Abstract: 

Osler is back at work and still grieves Revere's death. He will get a specimen page of each section of his library and of the index. Miss Walpole has gone to the Athenaeum but he will try to get someone else to help. He encourages Malloch to push on with the Pneumonia work.


Date: 
September 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Malloch, Thomas Archibald
Abstract: 

Osler is back at work and still grieves Revere's death. He will get a specimen page of each section of his library and of the index. Miss Walpole has gone to the Athenaeum but he will try to get someone else to help. He encourages Malloch to push on with the Pneumonia work.


Date: 
September 26, 1917
From: 
Sa'eed, M.
To: 
Osler, William
Abstract: 

Sa'eed writes of various rare and ancient Arabic medical texts, including the Kanoon and Al Korans.


Date: 
September 1, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Tyson, James
Abstract: 

Osler announces Revere's death. Details on his wounds. Darrach and Brewer of New York have operated on him. Cushing was with him at the end. It is a terrible loss, but they must face it bravely. Mentions Revere's interest and on his work in his battery.


Date: 
October 2, 1917
From: 
Osler, Grace Revere
To: 
Malloch, Thomas Archibald
Abstract: 

Osler is working hard on the Text-book. Mentions that he sometimes says "Let's run away and live in a cottage in Penzance".


Date: 
October 3, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Ballinger, John
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Ballinger for his letter. Glad that the matter has been postponed as he would have not been able to assist, as a meeting (Press) has been called.


Date: 
October 4, 1917
From: 
Osler, Grace Revere
To: 
Cushing, Katharine Stone Crowell
Abstract: 

Lady Osler tries to write to Cushing everyday and sends provisions to keep him warm. She has been told that Revere's grave is always fresh with flowers. Susan Chapin has secured work with the U.S. Red Cross to help with a hospital in Southampton. She writes of Osler's sorrow over the death of his son.


Date: 
October 7, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Simmons, George H.
Abstract: 

Osler asks Simmons to note in the Journal that his son who was wounded August 29th, was taken to the Casualty Clearing Station at which George Brewer of New York and George Crile were stationed. Darrach of New York operated and Crile transfused. Cushing was with him. Sends this account as many of his friends would be glad to know of this most fortunate coincidence.


Date: 
October 8, 1917
From: 
To: 
Abstract: 

Osler's notes at the end of "Tractatus de Pestilentiali ..." Very early and rare tract on Syphilis.


Date: 
October 10, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Farlow, John W.
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Farlow for his letter of sympathy. They must face the world bravely however much their hearts may ache.


Date: 
October 10, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Unidentified
Abstract: 

Thanks for his words of sympathy.


Date: 
October 11, 1917
From: 
Osler, Grace Revere
To: 
Osler, Featherstone Lake
Abstract: 

Lady Osler writes of her sorrow and loneliness upon the death of her son, Revere. She writes that Revere had developed into an unusually interesting chap, who was horrified by anything connected with war. She is looking after 200 American soldiers who have just arrived in Europe, giving them a glimpse of home life.


Date: 
October 11, 1917
From: 
Osler, Grace Revere
To: 
Cushing, Harvey
Abstract: 

Lady Osler sends Cushing clothes to keep him warm over winter. Malcom Peabody is expected in Oxford. Jones and McClosky, two Oxford Sisters, write often about Revere's grave and their visits there. Susan Chapin will serve as Chairman of the Red Cross Distributing Department. She mentions Joe Warren, Major Osgood, Futcher and John McCrae.


Date: 
October 13, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Editor of the Lancet
Abstract: 

Letter published in the Lancet, October 20, 1917, p.621. "HOME-BRED MALARIA".


Date: 
October 14, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Unidentified
Abstract: 

Osler writes of rare manuscripts. He hopes to see unidentified addressee at the upcoming Medical History meeting.


Date: 
October 22, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Andras, Gwendolyn Francis
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Gwendolyn Andras for her sympathy. Mentions his interest in common with his son, their friendship. Recommends she not to work too hard at her job. Details about the mortgage of her house. Civilities.


Date: 
October 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Proctor, Adelaide E.
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Proctor for her letter of sympathy upon the death of his son.


Date: 
October 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Ballinger, John
Abstract: 

Osler agrees on the 14th of December. Asks Ballinger to send him the material. Hopes that MacAlister will accept the dinner. Thanks for his report. Encouragement.


Date: 
October 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Walsh, James J.
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Wlash for his words of sympathy. They shall take the blow bravely. Civilities.


Date: 
October 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Dercum, Francois Xavier
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Dercum for his letter of sympathy. Belated thanks for a book Dercum sent him.


Date: 
October 25, 1917
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Hanna, H. Melville
Abstract: 

Thanks for his letter of sympathy. P.S. Mentions that he must be proud at the position the Cleveland school has taken, due to his influence.

Pages