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Letters sent to Flexner, Simon


Date: 
March 9, 1905
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler encourages Flexner to accept a position as professor of Pathology at Jefferson. Additional notes by Flexner.


Date: 
April 4, 1896
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler must decline Flexner's dinner invitation as he must deliver an address at a meeting on Diabetes. Additional notes by Cushing.


Date: 
November 11, 1896
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler congratulates Flexner on a presentation made at Hagerstown. Incl. ms. notes.


Date: 
March 11, 1905
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler congratulates Flexner on his recent work.


Date: 
July 8, 1898
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler expresses his sympathy over the death of Livingood. He has left Grace and his son at Bar Harbor for the summer.


Date: 
December 9, 1898
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

A series of letters from Tyson speaks favourably of Flexner (most likely regarding Flexner's candidacy for a position at the University of Pennsylvania).


Date: 
March 12, 1905
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler advises Flexner to provide White with a budget of his papers. Osler is concerned that Flexner will not be chosen for a position in Philadelphia because White is not familiar with him.


Date: 
September 15, 1899
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler welcomes Flexner back from his holidays and writes of his own summer activities. He reports that George H.F. Nuttall has taken Cambridge by storm. Incl. ms. notes.


Date: 
October 11, 1900
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler asks about some medical cases.


Date: 
September 1, 1904
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler writes of his decision to accept the Regius Professorship of Medicine at Oxford. He is sad to leave the Johns Hopkins, but he is looking forward to peace and quiet. Osler feels that a younger man could do better for the Johns Hopkins Medical School than he. He would like Flexner to write the introductory chapters on General Pathology for the new Systems of Medicine volumes he is editing for Lea Bros.


Date: 
September 14, 1904(?)
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler would like Flexner to contribute to the Systems of Medicine volumes he is editing for Lea Bros.


Date: 
March 24, 1908
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for arranging about Miss Fitzgerald. He suggests to have Mr. Justice Moulton's evidence before the Vivi-Section Committee published in the United States, as a separate campaign pamphlet. Sympathizes with his trouble. Mentions that in England, the people against the vivisection seem to have got into ill odor. Civilities.


Date: 
October 26, 1914
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for his help in the matter of the Belgian professors. The Rockefeller Foundation will solve the problem for a number of them. Denys is in Oxford with his family and is working with Dreyer. Van Gehuchten is in Cambridge. They are the two distinguished medical professors. Details about the financial conditions of Denys and van Gehuchten. Civilities.


Date: 
November 23, 1914
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler explains to Flexner that it is difficult to induce the Belgian professors to accept the Harvard or the Chicago offer. No one has accepted. It is a huge problem what to do with the Belgians here. The Government is bringing over another 50 000 from Holland. In Oxford, they have 15 Belgian professors with their families, all settled and most of them at work. Wonders what they should have done without the Rockefeller help, though friends in America have been very generous. It will be a long job to take care of them. Mentions that two of their rooms have been transformed in a sort of old clothes shop. Denys and his family are charming. The latter is doing a big research on tuberculosis. Civilities.


Date: 
March 17, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler reports that they are trouble with the cerebro-spinal serum, the results are very unsatisfactory. They have used the Lister Institute, the Burroughs and Wellcome, and the Mulford, and did not get any proper serological test. They are now using fresh serums prepared from Canadian organisms, but with no result. They are having no end of trouble in getting the carriers disinfected. Asks him advice, and if he has any new serum prepared on Martha Wollstein's suggestion. The outbreak is spreading.


Date: 
April 9, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for his cable and letter. Keogh told him that the supply had arrived. Had tried to induce them to appoint Robb, as Flexner suggested, but there are difficulties. Gordon of Bart's has been detailed for the work. Details about the first case treated, the serum manufactured at the Lister. The epidemic is declining. Sorry that they did not keep Ellis in the country, but he has to go to France with his unit. Thanks for the book. Details about it. The sickness among the troops in France is not great. The French and the Belgians, and in places the Germans, are having typhoid pretty hot. Love to Meltzer, Loeb, Cole and to the Flexners.


Date: 
May 10, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Robb writes that Flexner's serum is much more effective. There was something rotten with the stuff they were using in England, which explains the deceiving results. Fortunately, the epidemic is subsiding rapidly. Gordon will have a good report on the bacteriology. About Hort's paper in the British Medical Journal, he gathered from Gordon that he is only a "half-baked" bacteriologist. Cushing is visiting them and gave a sad story about the cases of gas bronchiolitis, of which they are beginning to get some cases. Comments about the Lusitania horror. It will take generations to bridge the present gulf between England and Germany. Civilities.


Date: 
May 25, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler informs Flexner that the apparatus arrived a week ago and he will send it on to Watson Cheyne. Asks him to thank Meltzer. The meningitis is subsiding. Heard better reports from the new serum. Mentions two cases at the Hasler Hospital. Robb is getting very good results.


Date: 
July 5, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler informs Flexner that the meningitis has practically gone, with an occasional resurgence, as at Birmingham. Sure that it will come back next winter with the new recruits. Has sent on his note to Gordon, whose work has been most satisfactorily. Robb's results have been excellent. They are settled down to the idea of a protracted war, two or three years at least. Gives his opinion on the strength of Germany. Deplores the gulf that is being dug between such nice people as were so many of their professorial friends and the rest of the world. Revere has gone to France with the McGill Unit. Civilities.


Date: 
July 7, 1915
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler sends Flexner Gordon's letter. The letter explains that they tried Vedder's starch agar and they are pleased with it. Technical details about his composition. Technical details about the meningococci's reaction with Flexner's serum, Mulford serum and the Pasteur Institute serum. Mentions that the Lister Institute and Burroughs, Wellcome and Co. have been preparing serum from strains from their cases. Robb asks him for cultures for Flexner, but his letter arrived too late, so he wired him to get some from Beattie.


Date: 
May 3, 1916
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for the Journal. Mentions last summer's cases of Jaundice at Paignton from Egypt. A few cases have occurred in France. He sent word to Rose Bradford about Flexner's work and also the abstract of the German paper. Comments on the epidemic nephritis. Civilities.


Date: 
May 11, 1916
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner and compliments him on the Journal. Norman Gwyn wrote him that they had discovered the spirochaete in a case of infectious jaundice at the No.1 Canadian General Hospital in France. The figures he gave are identical with the Japanese ones. Mentions that they had a fatal case of it at the Canadian Hospital in Taplow, for which he will have the specimens stained. Civilities.


Date: 
April 20, 1917
From: 
Murphy, Starr J.
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Rockefeller has received a letter from Osler with regard to post-graduate medical study in England. Enclosed the letter. Asks for his comments and recommendations.


Date: 
April 24, 1917
From: 
Murphy, Starr J.
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Murphy be glad to talk with Flexner about his suggestion regarding Osler's letter on the post-graduate training in England.


Date: 
May 1, 1918
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler offers Flexner good wishes on his trip back. Could not get the information asked by Flexner, because Denys was away. Will send the latter's reply. Mentions that he sent the Huxley bronze for Jacobs. Asks him to take a photo of it for the (Rockefeller) Institute and for him to put in the Collected Works. Greetings to Cole and the staff.


Date: 
July 15, 1918
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Acknowledgment of Flexner's letter of the 19th (CUS417/126.12). Osler would love to be with them all next year but he cannot possibly leave. Explains that they are tied up with many activities which are not very essential but it would not be appreciated if he went away for three months. He also dreads the over-warm welcome, and the many visits that would tax his heart too much. Will give him his final decision later. Thanks him for the invitation. Comments on George Draper. Has asked Newsholme to send the latter for a study of the outbreak of encephalitis. Details on the features of the outbreak. Draper said that the cases in Sheffield are of the same type as Heine-Medin. Mentions another outbreak in France where the organism described by Flexner and N. has been found. Asks him to keep it secret as the Bradford's letter was official. Civilities.


Date: 
August 6, 1918
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler informs Flexner that the encephalitis outbreak has subsided. Has asked Bullock to send Flexner material. George Draper is in France, Osler got Ireland to send him there, must have sent Flexner his brief reports on the waning epidemic. Discussion about it. Bradford writes about cases of a disease resembling polyneuritis, which is probably Heine-Medin disease, without the encephalitic symptoms. Put to his attention the fact that the letargic type has been prevalent in Paris and Vienna. Thinks that they are the same disease.


Date: 
August 23, 1918
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler invites Flexner to come directly to them if he lands in Liverpool. Draper must have sent him his report. Deplores that more experimental work was not done. The epidemic has subsided. Has not yet had the paper from Bradford on the epidemic of Polio-myelo-neuritis.


Date: 
January 31, 1919
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for a photo. Incites him to put a group of men at work to determine the incidence of syphilis in the newborn, stillborn and the community at large. Deplores the absence of trustworthy figures on the matter. Mentions the hot discussion in England. Osler with others are trying to have Venereal Disease put under the Public Health authorities. P.S. Acknowledges and thanks for the two Transylvania monographs. Comments on Charles Caldwell.


Date: 
January 31, 1919
From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flexner, Simon
Abstract: 

Osler thanks Flexner for a photo. Incites him to put a group of men at work to determine the incidence of syphilis in the newborn, stillborn and the community at large. Deplores the absence of trustworthy figures on the matter. Mentions the hot discussion in England. Osler with others are trying to have the Venereal Disease put under the Public Health authorities. P.S. Acknowledges and thanks for the two Transylvania monographs. Comments on Charles Caldwell.

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