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Items classified as Letter


From: 
Bracken, H.M.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Bracken is pleased to hear that the Phipps Institute will take a neutral position on the Congress on Tuberculosis question for the time being. He agrees with Flick that Drs. Trudeau and Biggs should not be left out of any Congress dealing with Tuberculosis. He comments on Daniel Lewis's strategy for organizing his own Congress.


From: 
Otis, E.O.
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Otis reports that Dr. Knight believes the object of the proposed Society for the Study of Tuberculosis could be accomplished within the American Climatological Association.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Trudeau, Edward Livingston
Abstract: 

Flick writes of the efforts of the Phipps Institute to bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. Daniel Lewis, of the American Congress of Tuberculosis, has asked Flick to join forces with him to oppose Clark Bell's efforts. Flick refuses to support either Clark or Lewis, as he feels that both men have ignored those who work with Tuberculosis.


From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler has just heard from Magnin in Paris that the International Congress on Tuberculosis has been postponed until 1905. Because two Congresses cannot be held in the same year, plans to bring the International Congress to the U.S. will have to be put off until 1906.


From: 
Porter, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Porter is in support of Flick's plans to bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. He received an invitation to Clark Bell's Congress, but he feels that Clark has not earned the confidence of the Tuberculosis workers in the country.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Osler, William
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Osler's upcoming lecture in Philadelphia. Flick has organized a dinner in honour of Osler, to which Phipps, Gordon, Ravenel, Tyson, Musser, Wilson, Martin, the Mayor of Philadelphia, and Harbison are invited guests. Due to various complications, Flick has postponed his plans to bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. He has invited Woodhead instead of Pannwitz to take part in a course of lectures in Philadelphia.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Bracken, H.M.
Abstract: 

Flick is glad to know that he and Bracken are in agreement over the subject of the Tuberculosis Congress. He feels strongly that the Tuberculosis workers should be free to chose their own President in the event of a Congress, and not have to settle for someone outside their field [possibly alluding to Clark Bell]. In his opinion, Dr. Trudeau is the natural choice for President.


From: 
Trudeau, Edward Livingston
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Trudeau feels that Clark Bell's last attempt to organize a Congress on Tuberculosis was a dismal failure. However, he understands that planning an event such as that is very difficult, as medical politics often get in the way. He is happy to stay out of the politics and continue on with his own work.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Porter, William
Abstract: 

Flick is not willing to associate himself with the rival Congresses on Tuberculosis spearheaded by Clark Bell and Daniel Lewis. He writes that the Congresses that have been held in the past have been a discredit to the country and to the medical profession. He feels that those that work with Tuberculosis have been largely ignored in this matter. He will wait until the rival factions withdraw before he gets involved in planning a Congress himself.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Trudeau, Edward Livingston
Abstract: 

Flick writes that if there is to be an American Congress of Tuberculosis, it should be directed by one who has worked in the field. He would like to plan a Congress in the future with Trudeau's help, but will wait until those presently battling for honours [Clark Bell and Daniel Lewis] are satisfied that their methods have failed.


From: 
Porter, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Porter has refused any official connection to Clark Bell's Congress on Tuberculosis. He lists several necessary measures that must be taken to combat the spread of Tuberculosis in urban centres.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Porter, William
Abstract: 

Flick believes that going into the homes of the poor and teaching them how to avoid spreading Tuberculosis is the most effective means of controlling the disease. He writes of the activities of the Free Hospital for Poor Consumptives in Pennsylvania. He states that the Phipps Institute will be made the pivotal point for Tuberculosis work, not only in the U.S, but throughout the world. The Institute was planning to bring the International Congress on Tuberculosis to the U.S. in 1905, but decided against it because of the rivalry between the Clark Bell faction and the Daniel Lewis faction.


From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf congratulates Flick on his idea to organize an American Society for the Study of Tuberculosis. Knopf is highly in favour of such a movement. He recently met with Otis who, though President of the American Climatological Association, is also in favour of Flick's project.


From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Osler's upcoming lecture in Philadelphia. He reports that the rivalry over the Tuberculosis question has intensified. After Osler informed people in Paris that there would be no Congress on Tuberculosis in the U.S. in 1905, he saw in the paper that Daniel Lewis's Congress has been postponed until 1905. Osler believes that a national committee should be organized to take charge of the entire issue.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Osler, William
Abstract: 

Arrangements for Osler's upcoming visit to Philadelphia. Flick comments that the Tuberculosis business is a mess, as both Clark Bell and Daniel Lewis are holding Congresses, and without any Tuberculosis men present.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Bell, Clark
Abstract: 

Flick regrets that he cannot permit his name to be used in any way in connection with Bell's Congress on Tuberculosis in St. Louis. He feels that the Congresses on Tuberculosis held in the U.S. in the past have been a discredit to the country and have given the U.S. a bad standing in Europe.


From: 
Bell, Clark
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Clark asks for a copy of Flick's book, "The Crusade Against Tuberculosis." He sends Flick an endorsement made by the U.S. Government for his American Congress of Tuberculosis. He asks Flick to be part of a committee appointed by The World's Fair Exposition for the purpose of organizing an International Congress on Tuberculosis in St. Louis.


From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf asks Flick if he is willing to make his feelings about the Congress on Tuberculosis public. Knopf would like to make the opinions of Flick and others known to the men who will assemble in Baltimore.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
Abstract: 

Flick is not willing under any circumstances to be associated with either Clark Bell's or Daniel Lewis's Congresses on Tuberculosis. He is adamant that an American Congress of Tuberculosis should be directed by men who have done Tuberculosis work, such as Dr. Trudeau. He also feels that due to Mr. Phipps's generosity in furthering the Tuberculosis cause, the Congress should be held in Philadelphia.


From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Many of the doctors Knopf contacted have agreed to go to Baltimore to discuss the Tuberculosis question and to form a national representative Tuberculosis Committee. Knopf finds two possible solutions to the current scandal. Firstly, a petition should be signed by the best medical men in the country and sent to the Government stating that the Congress on Tuberculosis under the direction of Clark Bell is not representative of the American medical profession. Secondly, he thinks that a counter-manifestation should be sent to St. Louis to oppose Bell's Congress.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
Abstract: 

Flick does not agree with Knopf's suggestions that a petition be sent to the U.S. Government to oppose Clark Bell's Congress on Tuberculosis or that a rival faction should be organized. He feels that Bell's Congress will naturally prove itself a failure and only then should they take action to organize a real scientific Congress for 1906.


From: 
Jacobs, Henry Barton
To: 
Adami, John George
Abstract: 

Jacobs reports on the motion made at a recent Conference in Baltimore, presided over by Welch and attended by a number of physicians interested in the study of Tuberculosis, to create a committee to deal with the present Tuberculosis issue in the U.S. The members of the committee are: Osler, Trudeau, T. Smith, Adami, V.Y. Bowditch, Knopf, Ravenel, Klebs, Janeway, Jacobs, Bracken, Flick and Biggs.


From: 
Knopf, Sigmund Adolphus
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Knopf believes that it would be best to put off the creation of a Tuberculosis Congress because of the possibility of opposition from the American Climatological Association. Knopf refers to his own article on the Tuberculosis problem, published in the North American Review, which weighs in favour of establishing a National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis


From: 
Jacobs, Henry Barton
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Jacobs requests a confirmation of Flick's willingness to serve on the Tuberculosis Committee. The first meeting of the Committee will be held in New York on February 27, 1904.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Jacobs, Henry Barton
Abstract: 

Flick will gladly serve on the Committee, recently appointed during a Conference in Baltimore, which will consider the proposed Tuberculosis Congress and other National Antituberculosis Associations in the U.S. The Committee will also consider the formation of a National Committee to represent the U.S. at the International Congress on Tuberculosis in Paris.


From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler invites Flick to join him for dinner while they are both in New York for a meeting of the recently appointed Committee to address the Tuberculosis question.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Osler, William
Abstract: 

Flick would like to take advantage of Professor Maragliano's time in the U.S. and plan a Tuberculosis Committee meeting around the date of his lecture in Philadelphia. Flick provides a list of organizations and individuals in Pennsylvania who could be of help in their crusade against Tuberculosis.


From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler approves of Flick's idea to organize the next meeting of the Tuberculosis Committee around the date of Professor Maragliano's lecture in Philadelphia.


From: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
To: 
Osler, William
Abstract: 

Arrangements for the meeting of the Tuberculosis Committee and Professor Maragliano's lecture in Philadelphia.


From: 
Osler, William
To: 
Flick, Lawrence F.
Abstract: 

Osler suggests that it would be better to have the meeting of the Tuberculosis Committee and Professor Maragliano's lecture on the same day.

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